{Home} Shining Once Again

Shortly after I arrived back in NYC with the light, I asked the super when he’d be able to install it.  After a minor scheduling hiccup, he came over yesterday to help.

It didn’t take me very long to reassemble the light.

This was the old light in the dressing room.  It didn’t even have a shade!

Taking it down wasn’t very difficult, but we did run into an issue when one of the screws in the box was rusted into the box itself.

The super’s solution was to drill a hole through the top of the box, and put a screw through that!  Which was a much easier solution than the other idea I had–install a new box.

Things were going along fine, until it came time to fit the canopy.

See the gap (the silver threads showing)?  He wouldn’t let that stand!  So down it came, and he cut the threads down by over a half inch.  Then back up it went!

It’s hard to get good pictures of it, but it’s beautiful!  Such a nice and regal addition to the small space.

{House} Patching Things Up

After I removed all the riffraff around the window, I was left with a lot of holes.  Which meant the next step before painting is patching.  The supplies:

I started with the center of the window, since it had the most holes and a ridge where a piece of wood used to be.

First, I sanded the sills a little to rough up the surface, take the shine off, and remove any bits and pieces.  Then, I took a little bit of the patching plaster out of the container with the putty knife, and smushed it into the holes.  I ran the putty knife over it again to smooth the patching plaster out, and make it level with the surrounding area.

Here, I’ve filled in the top two divots, but the bottom one still needs to be filled.

I was having so much fun patching the window, that I ended up running a layer over the whole piece!  There were a few paint drips that I wasn’t having luck sanding off, and with all the holes and divots, this made sense to do.  The original paint is bright white, while the patching plaster is off-white.

Then I reached up to patch the holes on the top sill.  So smooth!

The top of the window got attacked next.

This picture makes it really obvious where the patching plaster was applied.  The bright white is the existing paint, and the off-white is the patching plaster.

Remember when I said that the bottom of the fire escape gate was gross?  I wasn’t kidding!

It just took a little cleaning and some patching to become good as new.

Good thing I had so much fun patching up the window, because the walls are just as bad!

{Home} The Speed of Light

After living there for over forty years, my grandparents moved out of their house when I was in college.  I made trips down to their house to help my mom clean it out and take things back to keep.  On one of the trips, I noticed the chandelier they had hanging in their master bedroom, and asked if I could have it.  The next time my dad went down with my mom, they brought it back.

And it sat in that box for many more years, until I had a place to install it.  Which I now do!

It was heavily coated in dust and needed a good cleaning, so I got to work.  I took it out of the box, and quickly had a helper to investigate (that’s one of my parents’ cats).

I noticed how the crystals were attached to the fixture, so I could put them back in the correct place after everything was all cleaned.

Taking the crystals off was easy.  I took two yogurt cups and added warm soapy water to soak the crystals (I’m hesitant to use anything that will be used for food after cleaning projects like this, which is why I re-purposed the yogurt cups).

I used a microfiber cloth with the same warm soapy water to clean the fixture.

It took less than an hour to clean the whole thing.  It’s amazing the powers that soapy water have!

But there was still the issue that this is at my parents’ house, and I needed to get it back to New York.  So I carefully rolled up the crystals, and put them in a cloth bag to carry onto my flight back to the city.

Now all that’s left is to reassemble the light and install it!

{House} What Wood You Do?

I have a pretty sweet deal at my company: working from home.  Basically however often I want, too.  Most of us spend Fridays working from home, and that’s what I was doing one day when I heard a lot of commotion down the hall.

I went to look, and noticed a huge cart full of bundles of hardwood floor.  More or less the same floor I have in my apartment!  The floors had been completely removed from the apartment.  (This makes me sad, because it is perfectly good flooring!  As my mom likes to say, “they don’t make things like they used to.”)

I asked the men what was happening with it, and it was all going to the garbage!  So sad!  I asked if I could take some, and they carried a few bundles to my door.

My apartment already has wood floor, so what do I need with more?  Well, let’s talk about the kitchen floor.

That picture is from the tiny closet near the stove.  The original wood floor is visible under the red tiles (interior of the closet), but it looks to be in poor condition (or at the very least, in need of a serious refinishing job).  The rest of the kitchen has the peach tiles below.

I believe these are the second layer of tiles on top of the original wood floor.  The threshold between the kitchen and dining area is kinda wonky as well.  In my grand kitchen renovation plans, I’m hoping to refinish the original wood floor underneath the tiles.  But given its possible condition, having wood floor that was installed in another apartment at the same time as my wood floor was installed in my apartment is huge!  And it was free too!

As I was looking at the bundles, I had to walk the fine line between having just enough and not having enough.  The good news is that I only really need to do half of the kitchen area, since what’s under the cabinets isn’t important.  The bad news is that I have to find a place in my small apartment to store it for a year until the kitchen gets renovated.