{Hannah} Race Bib Binder

Before this year, I ran only one race each year.  Then I became good friends with people who run races all the time–and have even run a marathon and are planning on another!  They got me into running races more frequently, and I’ve been looking for a way to store and display all the bibs I now have.

One of my friends has a special bib album, but it was more expensive than I wanted to spend.  So I did what I do best and made my own.

My mom had made a family recipe book using a binder and sheet protectors, and that’s what I did for my race bib book.  A quick swing by Staples, and I had a small binder (in my favorite color no less!) and some pages for less than $15!

I’ve taken pictures before, during, and after every race, and I knew I wanted to include some of them in the album.  I placed an order at Walgreens Photo, since it’s quick, reasonably priced (especially with a coupon code), and there’s one around the corner from my apartment.

Then it was time to put it all together!  I put the bibs on one side (with a sliver of the edges folded under so they fit in the sleeves), and pictures from the race on the other.

I’m so excited to add to it as the year progresses, but the sleeve pack I bought only had 15 sheets in it, so I’ll need to buy another before the year is out!

{Hannah} Just the Tip

Before I moved to New York, I used to frequent the local cobbler and liked the work he did.  After a bad experience (or two) at a cobbler in NYC, I researched how to replace the heel tips on my shoes myself.  Turns out, doing it myself is much cheaper, quicker, and less damaging to my shoes!  Win win win!

Enter: a pair of basic black pumps in need of new tips…

…and a pair of vice grips.

It just takes a minute to adjust the vice grips to latch on to the tip and hold securely.

Then–using the minimal amount of upper body strength that I have–I pull really hard until the tip comes out.  Sometimes it helps to twist slightly to loosen the tip from the shoe.

For replacement tips, I like the Supertap tips from this retailer on ebay, as they’re $1 each (I buy them in packs of 10), come in various sizes and colors, and are rubber, which I think makes for a better heel tip than the plastic ones.

It’s hammer time!

Ta da!  Basically brand new shoes.

Now they are ready for another week of hard working and walking around town!

{Hannah} NYRR United NYC Half Marathon 2017

Yesterday, I ran the NYRR United NYC Half Marathon!  It was my third half marathon race, but the first time I ran in NYC.  I was very excited and the weather ended up being in the mid-30s and sunny, which is a perfect winter day for running.

Going into this race, I had a few goals:

1. Just to finish.  Signing up for, training for, and finishing a half marathon are all major accomplishments in and of themselves!  I’m proud of myself just for trying and getting stronger as each week of training passed by.

times square time running thru nyrr nyc united airlines half marathon 2017

Picture of Times Square as I was running thru!  The race announcers joked that this was the fastest you’d ever the thru there, and the only time as a NYer that you’d *want* to go to Times Square!

2. Beat my best half marathon time.  I ran my first half marathon in 2:12:31, which is a 10:06 min/mile pace.  The second half marathon ended up being canceled half way thru due to excessive heat and humidity, and runners that finished afterwards did not get an official time.  Both runs were Summerfest’s Rock ‘n Sole–which I highly recommend if you’re in Milwaukee.  This goal leads me to point #3…

A friend surprised me by coming to Times Square early to see me run!  She captured this shot as I zoomed by.

3. Run in under 2:05 hours (which is 9:33 min/mile pace).  I thought this would be fairly easy, since my training runs were at that pace or faster (I averaged a low/mid-9 pace on my long runs).

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4. Run in under 2:00 hours (which is 9:09 min/mile pace).  This one would be a stretch for me, but I thought with the adrenaline of the day and people around me, that I could do it…

nyrr nyc united airlines half marathon 2017 medal metal engraved

And I did!  1:59:25! 😀

I realized early on that my phone was under counting the miles, and was over a half mile ahead of the course halfway thru.  Which meant the pacing was very off.  I had a “fancy” pace wristband, so using the time from my running app, I was able to approximate my actual pace.  I pushed myself during the last few miles (so close! only a few more miles and minutes to go!), and then very hard thru the last half mile, to say that I tried my hardest to finish under 2 hours.  I didn’t feel the greatest right after finishing, but I’m so proud of myself for accomplishing a goal I thought was slightly out of reach.

But now what will my goals be for the next one? 😉

{Hannah} Darn It!

A few years ago, I was at a consignment shop and fell in love with a Diane von Furstenberg wool wrap dress.  As I was admiring it, I noticed a few small holes throughout the dress.  Not wanting to leave it behind, I negotiated an extra 10% discount, figuring I could try my hand at mending the holes.  And I did!

Fast forward a few years, and I regularly buy wool items with holes in them, knowing that darning small holes is fairly easy and unnoticeable.

I recently bought a sweater dress from Goodwill, and didn’t notice a hole in the sleeve until I got home.  The previous owner had repaired it with some scotch tape!  That’s not good enough for me, so I broke out a needle and thread and got to darning the hole.

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There are a lot of darning techniques, and everyone seems to put their own spin on it.  Most tutorials say to work from the inside of the garment, but I prefer the outside, so I can make sure it’s coming together well.

I start with a knot on the thread on the inside, and push the needle through to the outside.  Make sure the needle isn’t so close to the hole that it could get pulled into the hole.  Then I start pushing the needle through the knit weave, working my way across the hole.

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Back and forth, back and forth.  Once I’ve been across the whole hole in one direction, it’s time to go back in the perpendicular direction.

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Back and forth, back and forth, making sure to weave above and below the threads just added.

I make sure it’s tight enough to hold, but not so tight that it puts a pucker in the fabric.  I end with the thread next to the beginning end, and tie the two together a few times.

And then it’s done!

darn hole wool sew fix diy mend sweater dress

Depending on the hole size and location, some are easier to mend than others.  This hole was more of a long snag, and it still is visible if you’re looking for it.  The hole is located on the upper arm, which means it won’t be very apparent from most angles.  I bet no one would’ve even noticed if I hadn’t just shared this publicly!

PS. This dress also had some button accenting the end of the sleeves, which I removed with a small pair of scissors.  Who says that when you buy something it has to stay that way forever (I’m sensing a trend)?!