{House} Going Incognito

I neglected to show one angle in the dining area in my previous painting post.

Gasp!  The door and frame are the same color as the wall!

Yup! ūüôā ¬†In an old issue of Better Homes and Garden, a designer had a lot of doors in her bedroom, which she painted the same color as the walls to minimize their appearance, and allow for more flexible art arrangement (point #7).

I remember thinking it was a great idea (probably even before my apartment was a twinkle in my eye), and given my apartment’s lack of wall space without doors or openings, I was excited to try it out for myself! ¬†I’m¬†loving the way the door and trim look painted the wall color. ¬†Can’t wait to use this same idea in my dressing room–which has three doors!

{House} Stop, Drop, and Roll

Nope, nothing is on fire here, but I did stop, drop, and roll this weekend–with paint! ¬†The entryway and dining area finally got painted! ¬†After months of deliberation, I picked the color I liked the best all along:¬†Benjamin Moore Apparition. ¬†I had been afraid that it would be too dark, but these rooms have overhead light, which makes a big difference.

So I trekked the 7 blocks to the paint store, got two gallons of BM Aura paint in eggshell, and carried them back to my apartment. ¬†Most of my other paint supplies are from the hardware store closeout sale back in December (which includes a roller, roller extender, roller cover in a thick nap, and a paint tray (sorry I forgot to take¬†a picture before I got started–I was just too excited!)). ¬†My cutting in brush was the same one I used on my door.

I had to stop to move the furniture into the living area, and then it was time to get started!

There was one last cord to nowhere that I removed before painting. ¬†It’s the one on the right that goes over the door and down the side and was easily removed.

Cutting in took almost four hours!  The drop cloth ensured that I kept my floors mostly clean from stray paint, and the plastic sheet had quite a bit of paint on it by the end.

Then it was time to roll, which went much quicker!

The whole process was repeated the next day for the second coat.

And dragging my furniture back in was the best part!

benjamin moore 860 apparition gold brass sputnik red teal aqua turquoise

I was afraid that the color would be too dark, but it’s not dark at all. ¬†A little moody and velvety smooth. ¬†Also, the many imperfections on the walls aren’t as noticeable now that the walls are in a flatter finish (I think they were semigloss before). ¬†It’s definitely warmed the space up, and made it feel more welcoming!

PS.  Thanks to my brother for the great post title!

 

{House} Another Disappearing Act

Once I successfully moved the phone to its new location in the dining area, I was left with some holes and unpainted area on the back bedroom wall.

Continuing my love of patching things up, I quickly moved on to tackle this area. ¬†First up was scraping away the old paint build-up from around where the wire ran down the wall. ¬†I used the putty knife to scrape down the wall…

…and then did a little light sanding to smooth the last bits out. ¬†Once it felt smooth to the touch, I went back over it with the patching plaster.

It’s like it was never there! ¬†No one will be the wiser once I get on that painting thing that I keep putting off…

{House} Good as New

I had so much fun patching up the holes and dents in the window frame, that I knew my next stop was the disaster I left after I removed the cord to nowhere.

It was a little more tricky than the window, since it took more finesse to get into the corner of the wall and ceiling, and smooth things out enough.

Then there was the mess at the bottom of the wall.

I think I did pretty well!

Now I just have to sand and pick a paint color. ¬†And then actually paint…

{House} Patching Things Up

After I removed all the riffraff around the window, I was left with a lot of holes.  Which meant the next step before painting is patching.  The supplies:

I started with the center of the window, since it had the most holes and a ridge where a piece of wood used to be.

First, I sanded the sills a little to rough up the surface, take the shine off, and remove any bits and pieces.  Then, I took a little bit of the patching plaster out of the container with the putty knife, and smushed it into the holes.  I ran the putty knife over it again to smooth the patching plaster out, and make it level with the surrounding area.

Here, I’ve filled in the top two divots, but the bottom one still needs to be filled.

I was having so much fun patching the window, that I ended up running a layer over the whole piece! ¬†There were a few paint drips that I wasn’t having luck sanding off, and with all the holes and divots, this made sense to do. ¬†The original paint is bright white, while the patching plaster is off-white.

Then I reached up to patch the holes on the top sill.  So smooth!

The top of the window got attacked next.

This picture makes it really obvious where the patching plaster was applied.  The bright white is the existing paint, and the off-white is the patching plaster.

Remember when I said that the bottom of the fire escape gate was gross? ¬†I wasn’t kidding!

It just took a little cleaning and some patching to become good as new.

Good thing I had so much fun patching up the window, because the walls are just as bad!